Buying CBD oil for pain online is problematical. A study from the University of Pennsylvania published in 2017 found that nearly 70 percent of products sold online do not contain the concentration of the oil listed on the label. The researchers bought and analyzed 84 products from 31 different companies and found that more than 42 percent were under-labeled, meaning that they contained more CBD than indicated. Another 26 percent were over-labeled, with less CBD than indicated. The researchers wrote that while studies haven’t shown that too much CBD can be harmful, products containing too much or too little may not give purchasers the effects they seek. In addition, the team reported that a number of products analyzed contained a significant amount of THC, which can cause undesired effects.
The studies on CBD for headache pain are still in their infancy, but with promising results so far. A 2017 study published in the Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research Journal worked with 26 people who were experiencing rebound headaches. The pain management results were better for the cannabis-nabilone formula over either ibuprofen or nabilone alone. (As a nerdy side note, the article is a great read if you’re interested in the history of cannabis as a pain reliever.)

Since the loosening of legal policy around cannabis and the growing evidence in support of its health benefits, CBD oil has become an integral part of a lot of peoples supplement stack, used as a recovery aid by helping to improve sleep and reduce exercise-induced inflammation. Personally, I’ve been taking it for a few weeks have felt real, tangible improvements in my sleep quality.
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