The key is to effectively gauge exactly how much CBD oil it takes to start managing your pain. If you start off right away with a maximum dose of a 600 mg tincture, you will have no idea how much of the product it actually took to treat your condition, and how much you wasted (this is also important because you do not want to exceed dosage and end up developing a tolerance to the active cannabinoids).
As Dixie Botanicals claims on its website, “When it comes to quality, we leave nothing to chance.” To that end, the company tests each CBD oil batch on no fewer than three occasions during the production process: once after the hemp oil it uses is extracted; then again upon the oil’s arrival in the U.S.; and, for the final time, after the substance has been put into its range of products. What’s more, Dixie Botanicals proves that such rigorous quality control doesn’t necessarily mean high price tags for customers: its 100 mg tincture drops, for example, come in at a reasonable $29.99 per 30 ml bottle. The company’s novel “Kicks,” meanwhile, combine chocolate, caffeine and CBD in handy bite-sized chews that may tempt coffee addicts and candy fiends alike.
Our products are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and may not be used to diagnose, treat, or prevent any disease. Due to the limited amount of clinical evidence regarding hemp-derived extracts in treating disease states, we cannot offer any type of comment or recommendation. We do, however, recommend you research the National Academies of Science (NAS) publish report regarding the current state of evidence regarding cannabis research: http://nationalacademies.org/hmd/Reports/2017/health-effects-of-cannabis-and-cannabinoids.aspx
Research on CBD and anxiety has generally looked at cannabis as a whole product, not as CBD as a standalone compound. Some studies suggest that it can help with anxiety: like this 2011 study that suggests CBDcan reduce social anxiety or this 2015 review that says CBD could be promising for many forms of anxiety. It’s also important to consider whether the CBD comes from the cannabis plant and therefore may include THC, a cannabinoid that for some, induces anxiety. Read our comprehensive article on CBD and anxiety, here.
And now, onto the thorny issue of legality. The simple answer to the question is yes — if it is extracted from hemp. The 2014 Farm Bill established guidelines for growing hemp in the U.S. legally. This so-called “industrial hemp” refers to both hemp and hemp products which come from cannabis plants with less than 0.3 percent THC and are grown by a state-licensed farmer. 

If your intention is to help treat chronic pain, then you may want to start out with a lower dose, and then proceed from there. If you notice effective results, you can downsize the dose, or likewise you can always up the dose until positive results are achieved. The key is to only increase your dosage in small increments so that you are able to pinpoint exactly how much CBD oil it takes to treat your condition. Be advised, though, that you should not exceed the recommended daily doses that are listed on the bottle and you should consult with a physician.
To ship or not to ship, that is the question. And the answer isn’t as clear as you may think (or hope). Legally, there is still quite a bit of gray area surrounding shipping cannabis oil. Some experts say shipping is illegal and may result in confiscation and seizure, while others argue the Farm Act of 2018 makes buying, selling and shipping CBD oil perfectly legal, particularly if the CBD oil is hemp-derived. The DEA itself has stated that CBD is not a top priority for the agency.
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